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Home > Neurosurgery Research > BTRC > Aghi Laboratory  
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Aghi Laboratory
Principal Investigator: Manish K. Aghi MD, PhD

Current Research Projects
 
Dr. Aghi's laboratory focuses on the microenvironment of glioblastoma, with two areas of basic science research interests: (1) translational studies designed to improve oncolytic viral therapies, particularly herpes simplex virus (HSV)-based therapies for glioblastoma; and (2) defining the mechanisms by which gliomas incorporate marrow-derived progenitors into their vascular and perivascular architecture.
 
Oncolytic viral studies focus on the effect of features of the tumor microenvironment, such as hypoxia or extracellular matrix, on HSV therapy and ways to utilize this information to improve oncolytic HSV efficacy in clinical trials.
 
Vascular biology studies focus on identifying tumor-secreted factors that mediate the recruitment of perivascular progenitor cells to gliomas, and determining whether inhibiting these factors in conjunction with agents targeting the vasculature itself disrupts glioma growth.
 
 
UCSF UCSF Medical Center UCSF School of Medicine
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